Charles I of England by Van Dyck

Charles I of England by Van Dyck
Charles I of England by Van Dyck
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Anton Van Dyck (1599 – 1641) is one of the greatest portrait artists of all European Baroque art, as you can see check with some of his paintings such as The Painter and Sir Endimion Porter. Both this and the work that concerns us here which is the royal portrait of Charles I of England are an example of the style of this painter of Flemish origin who developed practically all of his pictorial activity in Great Britain.

Van Dyck's Charles I of England

Van Dyck's Charles I of England

However, his art is closely related to that of theNetherlands, to begin with because his teacher was the great Pieter Paulus Rubens, whose closest disciple he was advantaged and also the most independent.

In the paintings ofVan Dyckit can be seen that he managed to acquire the mastery of his mentor, when it comes to presenting us with the qualities and surfaces of objects or people he paints. I mean, he was a real virtuoso with brushes.

However, the tone of the work of one and the other is quite different. In Van Dyck's paintings there is always a certain atmosphere charged with languor and melancholy. And precisely for this reason, perhaps his triumph was total and absolute among the rich aristocrats of the English court. And above all, his art was very liked by the monarch Carlos I, who appointed him court painter in 1632, at which time the artist evenhe came to Britishize his name and became sir Anthony Vandyke.

In this work he presents us with the king in one of his favorite activities, since we see him precisely after dismounting from his horse after one of his hunts in the countryside. And the painter, knowing how the king would have liked to go down in history, presents him to us as a tremendously elegant character, showing a resounding authority and expressing his enormous culture, since this king of the Stuart dynastywas a great patron of the arts during his reign.

Undoubtedly Van Dyck's ability to immortalize characters with such qualities made him work tirelessly for high society, and in fact his paintings are, in addition to being artistic objects of enormous value, they are historical documents that show us to the last detail of the aristocracy of the time. Although it must also be said that there were so many commissions that he received, that he could hardly paint all the works that came out of his workshop, and that is why he had a large team of assistants. And even, there are some of those works in which his participation was reduced to a few brushstrokes, and of course the quality of these types of portraits, although signed by Van Dyck, is much lower.

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