Degas ballet dancers

Degas ballet dancers
Degas ballet dancers
Anonim

A Edgard Degas is usually included among the group of painters of Impressionism. However, Degas was slightly older than figures like Monet or Renoir. In fact, he was born in 1834, and like Manet, who was of his generation, he was always a sympathizer of the Impressionist artists and their aesthetic theory but remained a bit apart from them. And that is clearly visible in his works, because Degas was a great lover of both line and drawing, something unthinkable in the most orthodox formulas ofimpressionist art.

Degas ballet dancers

Degas Ballet Dancers

That's not to say he didn't seek out the “print” that made Monet and company famous. On the contrary, he looked for it in a field such as portraits, but that did not mean that he flatly rejected very solid and excellently well-drawn forms to achieve that impression. On the contrary, his drawing is part of his basic argument. The forms he paints were extracted from the contemplation of life and then he resorted to representations based on more traditional points of view, such as in his work The dance class, or completely unexpected angles of vision and framing, as is the case of this scene en titledBallet dancers that she made with the pastel technique, a technique that allowed her much more spontaneity and immediacy than the classicsoils.

The theme of ballet and dance is a constant in Degas, even for his sculptural creation, which is truly surprising in its time, with figures such as The Great Arabesque or The lovely fourteen year old Ballerina. And he was more interested in attending ballet training and rehearsals than in the theatrical performances themselves. She watched the dancers, resting, getting dressed, talking, learning, etc., and she took notes on all of it. Even this work can be considered more as a note or sketch than as a finished work. And she did it from novel angles that result in compositions like the one we see here

Sometimes it doesn't even show the dancers in their entirety, or seen from an impossible zenithal angle. And when we see those young women in their entirety, she chooses intricate postures, like here, and in ways that are difficult to examine. We see the two girls, resting after an exercise, one could even say that they are sore after the effort. Although,Degasdoes not try to empathize with her work. She never pretended to care about her mood. Her attitude is very similar to that of theimpressionistswhen painting a landscape. She does not seek the beauty of the dancers, nor capture her ability. Actually, he was concerned with the play of light and shadow on those bodies and their ballet dresses, at the same time that he wanted to create the space around him and capture movement.

Popular topic