Boulevard de Montamartre by Pissarro

Boulevard de Montamartre by Pissarro
Boulevard de Montamartre by Pissarro
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Camille Pissarro (1830 – 1903) in her last years of life abandoned her experiments with pointillist painting that she had createdGeorges Seurat and some of his followers like Paul Signac, and returned to the more purely impressionist forms that have become one of the greatest representatives of this pictorial style.

Pissarro's Boulevard Montmartre

Pissarro's Boulevard Montmartre

Although he dedicated himself to creating images inspired by urban landscapes. For example, he painted numerous impressions of the city ofRouenand its port, and also many of the streets and avenues ofParis. Among all of them, the series he created on theBoulevard de Montmartrestands out, which he captured at different times of the day, with different lights and in different seasons. He even painted up to 13 images of this corner of Paris.

However, of all of them there are four that stand out especially. One of them is this one with a nocturnal setting that is kept in the National Gallery in London. And this would be accompanied by Boulevard Montmartre at sunset of the L'Hermitage in Saint Petersburg, Boulevard Montmartre on a cloudy morning owned by Melbourne Victoria Museum and Boulevard Montmartre on a winter morning on display at The Metropolitan in New York. How can one seeseries of four works spread over four continents today.

For the realization of all of them in 1897 he rented a room in the Grand Hotel of Russia, from which he had a wide view of the entire avenue. These paintings not only show the variations in light and atmospheric conditions, but also convey the artist's own state of mind. Although in all cases they are pictures that have nothing ceremonious or solemn. They are simply views of an avenue full of life, with people on the move.

To do this, Pissarro used his characteristic extremely fast descriptive brushstrokes, which manages to give the scene an air of instantaneity. Movement, which is also helped by the chosen composition, based on the strong perspective of his high point of view. He creates everything from diagonals so that his vanishing point is not in the center of the oil painting, which certainly helps that sense of dynamism.

In this case it is interesting to see how he has painted urban lighting. We see how the gas lamps that served as streetlights at that time have already been lit. He has also illuminated the shops on the boulevard and with them he creates beautiful reflections. In short, it is an image in which the play of light and shadow predominates, in which everything is clear thanks to color, and the well-defined drawing is completely unconcerned.

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