Pissarro self-portrait

Pissarro self-portrait
Pissarro self-portrait
Anonim

Camille Pissarro cannot be considered a painter of human figures. Something that is verified when seeing that many of his masterpieces are of landscapes, be they from the rural environment as in The Red Roofs or in more urban environments as in his series on the Boulevard de Montmartre. However, throughout his career he maintained a certain fondness for the figure, as something acquired during his first pictorial stage of a more realistic nature.

Pissarro self-portrait

Pissarro self-portrait

Here he chooses himself to paint because he really is the person he knows the most. And he does it with the purelyImpressionisttechniques that characterize all of his art. That is to say, he does it with a rather thick brushstroke and already breaks the figure in some way, in which of course there is only color and no drawing.

Despite this lack of drawing, even so the art of Pissarro was always much more concrete than that of his contemporary Claude Monet, and in all of Pissarro's paintings you can see a fairly clear and resounding composition, as well as their forms are also much more defined than in the creations of other impressionist masters.

Pissarro, in addition to being an artist, was a great theoretician, very capable of studying and, above all, a coherent person when it came to uniting theories and practical execution. On the other hand, he had a very tenacious and constant character that led him toa persistent exploration in terms of style. Something that caused a continuous evolution in his art over the years, for example making his own pointillist creations after meeting and dealing in 1885 withGeorges Seurat.

And as if that were not enough, he was a born teacher, very gifted in teaching others, for example, he exerted an important influence on artists of the stature of the post-impressionist Paul Cezanne or the avant-garde Francis Picabia.

All these personal qualities led him to become the inspiration and director of the discoveries of other painters with whom he was related. To which he, on the other hand, kept them united, avoiding the clashes of egos so common in the art world. This can be seen, for example, in the group of painters, among whom the presence of Alfred Sisley stood out, who traveled with him to paint Pontoise. His favorite place to paint outdoors, the method of painting par excellence by Impressionist artists.

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