Gauguin's beautiful Angela

Gauguin's beautiful Angela
Gauguin's beautiful Angela
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This is an oil canvas madeby Paul Gauguinin 1889, prior to histrips to Polynesiathat changed the subject so much of his paintings. The painting is currently on display in the rooms of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

Interestingly, we see that he inserts a circular shape in the painting, just as it happens in the influential Japanese prints of the art of Ukiyo-e, which produces a certain rivalry of a painting inside the box.

Gauguin's beautiful Angela

Gauguin's beautiful Angela

Like everything in Gauguin's painting, the images he paints often have a lot to do with his own personal avatars. For example, he painted this canvas at a time when he had returned to Britain to somehow purify himself, after a rather turbulent stage, especially during his coexistence with Van Gogh in The Yellow House in the city of Arles, in French Provence. The presence of ancient ceramics in the picture is due to this spirit of returning to the origins, and to the most primitive. Something that he would later reinforce in hisTahitian works, and that is that he went so far as to say that in order to rebuild art one had to flee from the Renaissance and the classical. It was one of the artistic paths that Gauguin opened up, and that a few decades later, already in the 20th century, Jean Dubuffet and the Art Brut would take up again, although in a much more abstract way.

Gauguin withThis work was not looking for a naturalistic representation, in reality it was much more concerned with coordinating and matching the colors, and approaching everything from an essential simplicity where the harmonic conjunction of the different color zones predominated. He has a desire to go beyond the world of appearances to enter more deeply into the spiritual and soul field. Actually, what he longed for was to be able to capture the inner world and the different states of mind with equivalents of color and plastic. For this reason, the arrangement of the different elements and images that make up this painting obey mainly symbolic and decorative criteria, completely rejecting naturalism. These approaches led him to a completely arbitrary and totally unforeseen use of color, and this was another of the legacies that Gauguin's pictorial production bequeathed, since this trend would be greatly admired by the later fauvist painters.

This evolution of his color palette became more arbitrary since 1888. With colors full of meaning, which he spread smoothly. But before applying these masses of color, he used to trace the contours of the figures directly on the canvas with shades of vermilion or ultramarine blue. To then build the entire set and finally cover the interior of those figures with color.

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