Medinet Habu Temple

Medinet Habu Temple
Medinet Habu Temple
Anonim

The Egyptian temple of Medinet Habu located in the city of Thebes was the mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramses IIIof the Twentieth Dynasty.

The temple itself begins at pylon I, which gives way to a first courtyard, to which the Royal Palace was attached on one side. After this, you reach Pylon II, which also has its own patio.

Medinet Habu Temple

Medinet Habu Temple

Next is the usual hypostyle hall of Egyptian temples, as can also be seen in the remains of the Temple of Mentuhotep or Luxor. A room that is succeeded by others of smaller and smaller size until reaching the sanctuary itself.

Throughout this entire route different colossal sculptures are distributed, always related to the cult of the god Osiris and other regenerative divinities linked to death and the afterlife.

And you can also see on the sides, the spaces that served as warehouses for the powerful priests of the temple to store their goods there and administer them.

The reign of Ramses III corresponds to a period of decline of the New Empire and that is going to manifest itself in the architecture with the appearance of certain elements. For example, the temple walls have defensive bulwarks at the corners, and even the walls become a real wall, whichit gives a military character to the construction, despite the fact that in principle it is a place of worship.

And not only the temple is protected, especially there are defensive walls around the warehouses, the priests' dwellings, and the stables. It might seem that it was a turbulent time, but despite the fact that there were threats and the years of splendor of the pharaohs had passed, the truth is that during the reign of Ramses III there were no excessive conflicts or internal problems, and he maintained a stable government. Only suffered an invasion by the peoples of the sea and managed to stop it. An episode of his reign that became a feat highly revered by his people, and that reached a value similar to the Battle of Kadesh that was won in the time ofRamses II

In reality, surrounding a temple with walls and battlements had more symbolic than practical value. The gate also has a fortified character, and next to it is the Pavilion, with an exquisite and abundant decoration that indicates the use that was given to this area. It was a place of privilege and retreat for the pharaoh, from where he had excellent views of the wharf and its fertile lands. Because the Medinet Habu temple was located on the border between the desert lands and the cultivated fields, and to access it you had to go through a canal, for which a jetty was built.

Popular topic