Fra Angelico's Last Judgment

Fra Angelico's Last Judgment
Fra Angelico's Last Judgment
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Fra Angelico was a monk and painter, and his real name wasFra Giovanni de Fiesole. In fact, he lived a large part of his life (1387- 1455) in seclusion in the Convent of San Marcos in the Italian city of Florence, where he left some of his best paintings in the form of frescoes that decorate different rooms of that convent. One of them is this magnificent representation of the Last Judgment.

Fra Angelico's Last Judgment

Fra Angelico's Last Judgment

Fra Angelico's art is classified as belonging to the Renaissance, something logical due to the dates of his biography, since he developed it throughout the Quattrocento, and also because of certain characteristics of his style.

But the truth is that earlier styles can also be seen in his paintings, both Gothicartand Romanesqueart. For example, it is very archaic that we see here a Christ surrounded by a mandorla, as in medieval paintings and sculptures throughout Europe. And the arrangement he chooses to present the righteous on one side and the sinners on the other is also very much in the art of the Middle Ages.

Even the perspective of curved character that applies to the whole scene would have something to do with the wall paintings of the old Romanesque apses

However, other elements more typical of his Renaissance period are also observed, and that already distance him fromthose medieval models. For example, all figures have the same proportion, including God's, which gives it an idea of ​​realism and humanism.

In short, the art of Fra Angelico is an art of transition between one artistic era and another, and its great merit is that it was able to incorporate these evolutions into art of painting, always making religious-themed works, such as this Final Judgment, or others such as the Virgin of Humility or its different representations of the Annunciation of the Virgin, among which two examples stand out, one made with the tempera technique on a panel support that is safeguarded in the Prado Museum in Madrid and another painted with the fresco technique for the same Convent of San Marcos in Florence.

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