Woman in Black at Cassat's Opera

Woman in Black at Cassat's Opera
Woman in Black at Cassat's Opera
Anonim

Mary Cassat (1844 – 1926) is another of those rare examples of a woman artist who has gone down in history. And with the added addition that she reached certain heights of triumph during an era, that of Impressionism, in which there was also another woman who stood out in the art of painting such asBerthe Morisot with works such as The Cradle or Young Woman Sitting on a Sofa.

Woman in Black at Cassat's Opera

Woman in Black at Cassat's Opera

And as if being a woman wasn't enough to achieve success in the arts, Mary Cassat hailed from United States, a country that at that time hardly had a tradition of artists that they had any recognition in Europe. Although it is true that in those same years, between the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, there was another very talented American painter, John Singer Sargent, also the author of Impressionist paintings such as his Perseus.

But back to Cassat. She was a painter who worked as a disciple ofEdgard Degas, and who came to exhibit with the most famous and prestigious group of Impressionists. She actually came from a we althyPennsylvania familyand from a young age she showed her fondness and facility for brushes. She therefore studied Fine Arts, however when she decided that she wanted to be an artist, her family did not support her at all. So one fine day she decided to leave her native country andtraveling to Paris, the place where he would practically live the rest of his life and where he made his main creations. And possibly one of her best works is thisWoman in Black in the opera, executed by the painter in 1874.

It's an image that makes us think, or rather invites us to play. Because she presents us with a woman, dressed with the utmost modesty, sitting in a theater box and observing with her small binoculars. But at the same time, she herself is observed. For whom? For us, the spectators who see a spectator. But the painter goes even further, and in one of the boxes she distinguishes a man who is also watching and looking at the woman with binoculars. Or is he us?

This is for the image as a whole, but then you have to analyze it compositionally. The composition scheme for the canvas is really a display of originality. Because practically the right half of the canvas is occupied by the black volume of the woman in a very rigorous foreground. She gives us her profile, so that we can see the theater, simply presented in the curve of the boxes. A curved line that gives dynamism to the painting, immediately identifies the place where the scene is located and directs our gaze, wanting to find the same point that the protagonist of the painting is looking at, which may be the stage itself or perhaps another box in the one who looks for his lover or a rival.

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