Bernini's Neptune and Triton

Bernini's Neptune and Triton
Bernini's Neptune and Triton
Anonim

This sculptural group made of marble and copper by the Italian artist Gianlorenzo Bernini in the year 1620, was conceived to serve as the crowning of a water pond in the garden of the Villa Mont alto in Rome. The set should be placed on a balustrade, precisely in front of a wall that had no opening and would be framed by two small fountains.

Bernini's Neptune and Triton

Bernini's Neptune and Triton

Thinking about this placement, the sculptor made a work where the figures are on a slightly larger scale than human, and above all he designed the group to have a single perspective and a single point of view. However, today the work remains on display at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, as shown in the photograph.

For this reason, visitors can now surround the sculpture's surroundings 360 degrees, hence when turning and looking at it from certain points of view, it can be seen that there are perspectives in which the work loses coherence.

And the fact is that Bernini took into account the final locations of his works so that they would be perfectly integrated into their architectural environments, as well as mainly working on the points of view that would be possible from those locations, as can be seen in masterpieces such as The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa or The Prophet Habakkukand the angel of the Roman church of Santa Maria del Popolo. While if he worked on works that were going to be completely individualized, he took much more care in the whole of the work, as can be seen for example in his David

In the case of the group of Neptune and the Triton, it focuses mainly on the movement of the god of the sea, which is very energetically going to stab his trident, performed in copper, that is metallic, as it would be according to Latin mythology. With that move he was going to be able to pacify the waves.

Choosing a moment like that is typical of the compositions of his works. Since, as a general rule, he chooses the most critical and fleeting moments for his performances. And he achieves this with forms that are full of dynamism and movement, something usual in the visual arts of the baroque style. As is typical of baroque sculpture the drama of the scenes, the representation of climaxes that clearly capture the essence of each episode or the character of the characters represented.

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