Italica deposit

Italica deposit
Italica deposit
Anonim

The archaeological complex of Itálica is located in the Andalusian city of Santiponce, just 7 kilometers from Seville. In fact, Italica is considered to be the seed of the current Sevillian city.

Its foundation dates back to 206 BC, when Publius Cornelius Scipio “The African” created a large hospital on this site to house the wounded that the troops were suffering Romans in their war against Carthage, in the II Punic War.

Italica deposit

Italica deposit

That hospital eventually became the permanent residence of those first wounded, who were originally from Italy, hence the name of what would become the city of Italica, that little by little was gaining in prosperity and size. Until it became one of the main Roman cities created in Spain, or Hispania, as it was known then.

In fact, years later one of the great Roman emperors, Trajan (53 – 117), would be born here, and it is also believed that his adoptive son and heir to the Roman Empire, Hadrian (76 -138) could have been born here, although he denied it in his memoirs, although it is undeniable that he received a large part of his education in Italica, and his links with the city were very important. In fact, it was he who promoted the construction of a large new neighborhood in the city, the nova urbis, which in practice is what makes up a largepart of the archaeological site that can be visited today.

Thus, Italica has two distinct parts. The vetus urbis, or old area, where the city originated in the late 3rd century BC, and the nova urbis that prompted Hadrian and which was occupied practically from the 2nd to the 3rd century. While the oldest area was occupied until the arrival of the Muslim conquerors in the 8th century, and much of what was Itálica today is kept under the modern city of Santiponce.

Italica Theater

Italica Theater

However, there are important buildings that have been excavated, such as the Theatre that was built at the time of Emperor Augustus, although it had several later reforms. You can also visit the famous Italica Amphitheater, one of the largest preserved in the entire Empire.

This in terms of large buildings, but in Italica you can appreciate the typical urban planning of Roman colonies. Here, in the nova urbis, you can see an urban framework conceived from wide cobbled streets, some of them with arcaded sidewalks, and in which you can still see what the water supply and sewer network used to be like.

Mosaics of the Planetarium House

Planetarium House Mosaics

Remains of some public houses have also been preserved, such as the great baths, the temple dedicated to Trajan or Traianemum, or several houses that preservemosaic pavements, such as the House of Birds, Neptune or the Planetarium. And it is that in times of the Roman Empire the we althiest and most public houses always had large mosaics on their floors, whether they were urban or rural houses, as can also be seen in the Roman Villa of La Malena, in Aragón, north of Hispania.

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