Guastavino Grand Central Station (NY)

Guastavino Grand Central Station (NY)
Guastavino Grand Central Station (NY)
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The Spanish architect Rafael Guastavino Moreno (1842 – 1908) was an emigrant who arrived in New York in 1881, and never left the United States, where he created some of his most iconic buildings, especially in New York, where there is a type of vault named after him: “the guastavino vaults” and that can be seen in places like the Gran Central Station and its Oyster bar, or places as symbolic as theEllis Island lobby, where Guastavino himself passed when he entered the country, like one more emigrant, but years later he would be in charge of remodeling this place, which was always the first thing they saw Newcomers to USA

Grand Central Terminal New York

New York Grand Central Terminal

Ellis Island Record Room

Ellis Island Record Room

Guastavino came from a Valencian family of builders. Although he soon moved toBarcelonato study and receive his first commissions, including theBatlló factoryowned by the same family that would commissionGaudíthe Casa Batlló. Another of his commissions there was theTeatro de la Massa in Vilasar de D alt, but this work was never completed, because in 1881 he emigrated with his entire family.

It is true that his wife and part of his children went to Argentina, whilethat he stayed in New York with the youngest of his children and the nanny, who was his mistress at the time. To that hectic love life we ​​must add his economic adventures, since to make this trip he had to make a scam, which is why he could no longer return toSpain.

There after a difficult beginning, he ended up succeeding with his brick vault construction systems. A system seen today at Grand Central Station or Ellis Island, but also at Cathedral of Saint John The Divine, the Natural History Museum, the Carnegie Hall and many other New York buildings. Altogether he designed 360 buildings in New York, some 100 inBoston, plus those inWashington, Philadelphia or B altimore, where he died.

Vault of The Oyster Bar in Grand Central Terminal

The Oyster Bar Vault at Grand Central Terminal

On his death he left a settled company that his son inherited, the Guastavino Company, and which lasted until 1962, when more than a thousand buildings had already been built, especially in United States, but also in Canada, Cuba or India . With works as important as the Universities of Yale or Berkeley, the Metropolitan Museum of NY, the Archives where the Declaration of Independence or theUnited States Federal Reserve.

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