Constable's Weymouth Bay

Constable's Weymouth Bay
Constable's Weymouth Bay
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This oil painting on canvas in 1816 by the English artist John Constable and is currently kept in the National Gallery in Londonis a magnificent example of the pictorial style of this fantastic landscape painter with works as acclaimed and valued as The Lock or The Hay Wain, which is exhibited in the same London museum.

Constable's Weymouth Bay

Constable's Weymouth Bay

Constable is capable of breaking down light into different tones to make it vibrate in the illuminated areas, and even turn it into transparencies in other darker areas in the shade. To do this, he uses intense colors and breaks his own brushstroke with a series of curls and turns, which is what provides this movement and, ultimately, life to his landscapes.

The composition is cut off by the low hill that closes the beach from the bay. That is the background, while in the foreground we have stones and rocks that give the place a wild look, and more so compared to the soft meadows that go away towards the hill.

It is very interesting to stop to contemplate how this artist painted, since it is palpable that for certain areas, such as waves or clouds, he did not hesitate to resort to a very heavy brush, giving a material aspect to what thought convenient.

A determining aspect of the work is the sky, something that fascinated Constableas can be seen in works such as The landscape with double rainbow, where the sky occupies practically the entire canvas. That doesn't happen in this depiction of Weymouth Bay, however, the strip of sky it represents is very prominent.

This is a sky with many clouds, which seem to move before our very eyes. They are colored stains that he made using the spatula in broad strokes in a way that extended the blue of the sky and mixed it with other colors such as white, ochre, various blues and grays. Always giving it very suggestive shapes, in fact, he painted Weymouth Bay on several occasions, with frames identical to this one, but varying the sky and therefore the lighting of the area. Which served him to create effects and convey his state of mind, something that is obviously very typical ofRomanticism. Although, in the case of John Constable he did not reach the marked effects of other artists such as Friedrich.

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