Kalyan Mosque of Bukhara

Kalyan Mosque of Bukhara
Kalyan Mosque of Bukhara
Anonim

Actually, this whole impressive monument of the city of Bukhara or Bukhara in the Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan is more than just a mosque, since it is formed by the temple itself, but it also highlights its imposing minaret and the madrasa or Koranic school that is integrated into the complex. And all this is just one of the elements of the historic center of a city that is listed as World Heritage Site, both for its imposing religious buildings and for being a magnificent exponent of the artistic and architectural influences that flowed for centuries throughout Asia thanks to the Silk Road, on which Bukhara, like other Uzbek cities, played an important role.

Kalyan Mosque of Bukhara

Bukhara Kalyan Mosque

Of the whole set, the oldest element is the Kalyan Minaret, since it dates from the 12th century, specifically from 1127 when it was built by the ruler Qarakhanid Mohammad Arslan Khan, and is even known to have been designed by a certain Bako. How do we know so much about a work of this style? Well, basically because it is a true construction milestone since the minaret reaches almost 47 meters in height. But not only is he tall, he is also of great beauty. So much so that when the conqueror Genghis Khan came through here, he practically razed the entire city, except for this tower that left himfrankly impressed, especially by its fine brick decoration.

As for the mosque, it is already a work of the fifteenth century. The temple, as usual in this type of Muslim religious enclosure, is organized around a patio. However, in addition to the decoration of these different facades based on mosaics and tiles, the characteristic note of this mosque is found in its roof and its roof, which has nothing and more and nothing less than 288 domes of the most varied sizes..

And to complete the ensemble, in the year 1530 and under the reign of Ubaydallah Khan the madrasa Mir-i Arab was built as an annex. A school of the Koran still in use today.

This compound, like the Kalyan Mosque, is also organized around a courtyard with four iwans. And both in that external area of ​​the building, as well as inside, you can see the key elements that define the peculiar architecture of Uzbekistan, such as the magnificent turquoise domes, as well as the repertoire of tiles of different colors (blue, green, gold, yellow or white) that cover the walls. Something that is seen in this type of religious buildings, but also in other civil ones and even in those for funerary use, such as the famous Mausoleum of Timur or Timerlán in the city of Samarkand, another Uzbek city declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

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