Rafael Moneo Roman Art Museum

Rafael Moneo Roman Art Museum
Rafael Moneo Roman Art Museum
Anonim

This is one of the works that has given the Spanish architect Rafael Moneo the most prestige. He designed the building that was to house the Museo Nacional de Arte Romano de Mérida in 1985, and after it he has not stopped working all over the world and also in Spainwhere another of his great works is the Kursaal building in San Sebastián.

Facade of the Museum of Roman Art in Mérida

Facade of the Museum of Roman Art in Mérida

In fact, if we compare the Museum of Roman Art and the particular bucket found on the beach in San Sebastian, we can summarize some of the elements that characterize the postmodern movement in which Moneo is integrated.

The Postmodernism in architecture, was originally conceived as a renovation of the rationalist constructions that came from times of the Bauhaus Schooland Le Corbusier. For that reason it was a very diverse and colorful architecture, with very open concepts when designing each work.

What the building was for and where it was going to be built was taken into account. In this way, in many cases, they were raised with great respect for local traditions and the history of that location. And of course in that sense one of the greatest exponents in this work of the architect originally from Navarra, born in 1937 and who is still active.

Not in vainis a National Museum of Roman Art, which houses the main archaeological finds found in the city of Mérida, known in Roman times as the important city of Emerita Augusta.

And that's why they didn't hesitate to recreate the type of spaces and shapes that evoke Roman architecture. The approach is as simple as it was considered vital that the continent has to do with the content. In other words, there is a visible and intimate relationship between the pieces on display in the museum and the building itself.

This is the reason to be inspired by classical architecture, specifically in the period of the Roman Empire and in its larger-scale buildings monumental. Remembering it not only with the leading use of brick (within the construction tradition of Mérida), but also using typical elements of those historic buildings, such as the large round arches common in the baths.

Interior of the National Museum of Roman Art in Mérida

Interior of the National Museum of Roman Art in Mérida

With this, what is achieved is that the visitor to this museum feels the imperial grandeur and the historical value of what is exhibited and kept there, without forgetting that in some way the building must live up to some monumental remains that still remain in the city, especially the neighboring Teatro de Emerita Augusta.

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