Presentation of Jesus in the Lochner Temple

Presentation of Jesus in the Lochner Temple
Presentation of Jesus in the Lochner Temple
Anonim

This panel painted with a mixed tempera and oil technique by the German artist Stephan Lochner was made in Cologne around the year 1445, however today it can be seen in the Museo Gulbenkian de Lisboa, in Portugal.

Stephan Lochner is one of the most distinguished painters ofGothic art in Germany, and surely the most prominent in the city of Cologne, an important artistic center due above all to the presence of the imposing cathedral of him.

Presentation of Jesus in the Lochner Temple

Presentation of Jesus in the Lochner Temple

he had a short life (c. 1410 – 1451) but one full of work and he did not lack commissions or prestige. However, after his death he was quickly forgotten, and his value as an artist was not recognized again until the times ofRomanticism. There were even authors who compared them to Rafael, and others like the writer Goethe saw in him a forerunner of portrait painting at the same time that he was influenced by the byzantine art.

However, his art also had other important influences. It is known that he began painting in his homeland ofMeersburg, inUpper Swabia. But as a young man, around 1430, he went to theNetherlandswhere he met the art of geniuses likeRobert CampinorJan Van Eyck, respective authors of works such as theMerode Triptych or the Arnolfini Marriage.

No doubt it is because of them thatLochnercares a lot about raising spatial questions in some of his paintings like this onePresentation of Jesus in the temple. Here you can see some interior architectural forms, centered on the presence of an altar. All with a clear perspective towards the bottom, with a window and a stained glass window. Curiously, all this interior architecture has little to do with the forms of the Gothic, dominated by the pointed arches and the ribbed vault. However, everything here has a clear Romanesque and even classicist aftertaste.

This is an example of a painting in which Lochner was concerned with this type of spatial issues, but it is also true that in many other of his works he is not interested in these types of perspective issues and resorts to traditional backgrounds gold, common in the international gothic style to which this painter can be ascribed.

On the other hand, what is common throughout his production is his interest in the human figure, something that did not go unnoticed by Albert Dürer himself, the great representative ofGerman Renaissance, master of the portrait and above all of the self-portrait.

Dürer is known to have visited Cologne many years after Lochner's death, and once there he specifically asked to see the work of the masterStephan of Cologne. And it is that the faces and clothing of Lochner's characters possess an undoubted subtlety and the restrained expressiveness typical of hisepoch.

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