Botticelli's Lamentation over the Dead Christ

Botticelli's Lamentation over the Dead Christ
Botticelli's Lamentation over the Dead Christ
Anonim

This panel was originally painted by Sandro Botticelli for the church of San Paolino, located on the same street where the artist lived in Florence. However, today the work is no longer in Italy, and by chance it can now be seen in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich, in Germany.

The scene is very dramatic, something that fits perfectly with the subject matter. In the center we see the dead body of Jesus, which stands out both for its curved position and for the whiteness of its skin. That lifeless body is supported by his mother, the Virgin Mary, who in turn is supported by Saint John (the beardless apostle).

picture

Botticelli's Lamentation over the Dead Christ

The rest of the characters can also be identified, such as Saint Peter with his key at one end, Saint Jerome at the other almost naked, Saint Paul with the sword, or the Three Marys that surround the body lifeless, including Mary Magdalene. All of them are precisely in front of the open tomb, which with its stones and the darkness in the background adds even more drama to the scene.

We can appreciate that the entire composition is drawn from geometric concepts and lines, such as the equilateral triangle that encompasses Jesus, the pious women at his head and feet, and the Virgin Mary herself surrounded by the apostles in the center. But in turn there is a wavy line that generates that bodyof Christ. Everything in that composition is taken care of down to the last detail, such as the colors in which each character is dressed or the rigidity of his posture. Everything appears perhaps excessively refined, which subtracts a certain emotional sensation from the work, and for this reason it has not achieved the fame of other paintings by the Tuscan painter, such as his famous Spring or the Birth of Venus. Although it is evident that the latter also had in their favor that they were not religious images and that they have also been preserved in the city of Florence, in the Gallery of the Ufizzi who made them one of their emblems.

And it is that as in other religious works by Botticelli, such as the Adoration of the Magi or the Madonna of Granada, the painter always treated them with a very traditional tone. He was not looking for aesthetic innovations, but wants to seek introspection from both the characters and the faithful when they see them.

Popular topic