Dürer's View of Nuremberg

Dürer's View of Nuremberg
Dürer's View of Nuremberg
Anonim

The German painter Albert Dürer has gone down in Art History for being the greatest representative of Renaissance creation in Germanic lands. And above all he is known for his intense work as an engraver, or for his religious-themed paintings and his numerous self-portraits. However, his facet as a landscaper is not well known.

picture

Dürer's View of Nuremberg

In that genre he made various views of mountains, but he also created views of the city of his birth. And that is what he represents in this work he made between 1496 and 1497, in which we see a panoramic view of his hometown of Nuremberg, which is now preserved in theKunsthalle Bremen, Germany.

Most likely, this painting is not a landscape work as such, but rather a previous study of work that the artist used to create backgrounds for other compositions. However, at the same time we can also say that it is more than just a sketch, since you can see certain details painted with great detail.

In addition to the fact that he has known how to generate a certain rhythm, as if the image were to be viewed individually. Hence, the balanced and compensated distribution of towers and spiers that break the low horizon, thus breaking the monotony, has been taken care of. And likewise, the image has a certain dynamism thanks to the curved layout of its streetmain.

The truth is that it is a work that shows us a completely different painter than the one we are used to, since the great works of Durer such as The Adoration of the Magi, for not talk about his most impressive engravings, such as those that illustrate the Apocalypse of Saint John, works in which we see an artist of exquisite and powerful drawing. However, here the watercolor technique gives us a much softer brushstroke, and allows him to capture his excellent command of light.

The thing is that he mastered watercolors during his first trip to Italy in the year 1494. In fact, many of his mountainous landscapes were made especially when crossing the Alps on that trip. Although, thisView of Nurembergis later and obviously he made it in his place of residence. That is why you can already see that he not only dominates the watercolor technique, but that he has learned a lot after his trip to Italian lands, where he knew first-hand theQuatrocento Renaissance. Something that influenced his painting, and through him all German artists of the 16th century

Popular topic