Hannibal in Italy by Ripanda

Hannibal in Italy by Ripanda
Hannibal in Italy by Ripanda
Anonim

The Carthaginian general Hannibal, who in the third century BC, was able to threaten the future splendor of the almighty Rome, It has been the source of inspiration for works from the most diverse eras, some by great masters such as the Englishman William Turner or the Spanish Francisco de Goya.

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Hannibal in Italy by Ripanda

And here we bring you another example. These are mural paintings made by the Italian painter Jaccopo Ripanda between 1508 and 1509 on the walls of the palazzo dei Conservatori in Rome, and that today are some frescoes that are shown in the Capitol Museum of the Italian capital itself.

That historical character already fascinated in Roman times, both for his ability to fight and strategy, and for his feared cruelty during thePunic Wars. Something that was amply portrayed by ancient historians such as the Greek Polybius or the Latin Tito Livio.

Actually, Hannibal had everything to become a reference and a source of inspiration, since being a twentysomething he managed to come from North Africa, fromCarthage, to Italy. But he did not enter the transalpine country from the south, but he did it by crossing the mountain range of theAlpswith his army. In fact, such a long journey was quite a feat, but it also meant his final defeat, sincethat the exhaustion of his troops was absolute, and we can see it in this fresco.

Although it is clear that this is not what attracts the most attention. Of course, all eyes fall on the central character who is none other than Hannibal himself, who rides on the back of a great elephant, since the chronicles reveal that he came to Italy with a group of these pachyderms.

It is a note of exoticism that further enhances the character and gives it an appeal for undoubted artistic inspiration. An exoticism and attractiveness that is multiplied here by the clothes he wears, which have no historical criteria. And it is that Hannibal, a Carthaginian general of Antiquity, actually appears to us as an oriental prince, just as a Turkish nobleman would dress in the 16th century.

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