Church of Saints Justa and Rufina in Maluenda

Church of Saints Justa and Rufina in Maluenda
Church of Saints Justa and Rufina in Maluenda
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We have already spoken on occasion that Mudejar art is an artistic style that has only been practiced in Spain, given that they lived here for much of theMiddle Ages the three cultures: Christians, Muslims and Jews, and that served to merge many traditions to create new things, including this beautiful art in which typical Muslim materials are used as it is brick or ceramic to create Christian spaces, which are also often decorated with elements of Islamic inspiration.

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Exterior Church of Saints Justa and Rufina of Maluenda

The examples in some Spanish regions are many, and one of the richest in this sense is Aragón, where even its Mudejar art is declared Patrimonio de Humanity. And we're not just talking about the best-known art in cities like Zaragoza, where the Aljafería Castle is, or Teruel with its great repertoire of towers and Mudejar churches. In fact, samples of this type of art abound in many small towns in rural areas. For example, in the case of Maluenda named here, where not only is this elegant church of saints Justa and Rufina preserved, but also It houses parts of the Mudejar construction in the oldest church in the town, that of the Asunción, which began to be built in the 16th century.XIII.

The following century the construction of this other temple dedicated to the two saints would begin. Its outward appearance is like content, with those two little symmetrical towers on its sides, and somehow it doesn't seem to anticipate the jewel inside. It is a typically Mudejar temple, especially with regard to its apse and the gallery of arches at the head. While the three naves of the church are covered with the usual ribbed vaults of Gothic art, capturing that peculiar artistic fusion that is Mudejar.

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Interior church of Saints Justa and Rufina of Maluenda

The most emblematic thing about the interior of the temple is its internal decoration, which is based on the Islamic atauriques used for the windows, although not all of them have withstood the passing of the centuries. And in fact, we can see that over time ornamental details from various periods have been incorporated, from the flamboyant style pulpit with Muslim airs to the tiles of the presbytery placed in the 16th century.

The fact is that this temple, which does not usually appear in art history manuals, perfectly captures the style of fusion that Mudejar art represents. That even manages to combine and integrate perfectly with artistic forms made much later, always maintaining its own personality and aesthetics.

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