Ring of Brodgar

Ring of Brodgar
Ring of Brodgar
Anonim

North of Scotland is the group of the Orkney Islands. An archipelago made up of some 70 islands. And in one of them some extraordinary prehistoric remains have been found. It is the so-called Neolithic Heart of Orkney, and is made up of several spectacular sites such as the Rocks of Steness, the tomb of Maeshowe, the population of Skara Brae and the so-called Ring or Circle of Brodgar that concerns us here. And all of this is declared a World Heritage Site.

Surely of all this, the most spectacular is the Ring, which somehow remotely recalls the well-known Stonehenge in the land of England.

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Ring of Brodgar

It is a large circle of more than 100 meters in diameter and surrounded by huge stones. Something called henge. Originally, the construction had up to 60 large stones arranged in a vertical position, although less than half have survived to this day. Specifically 27. They are huge stones, up to 4.5 meters high that are located on a large circular moat 3 meters deep and 10 meters wide. Really admirable dimensions, considering that this would be done more or less around the year 2,500 BC. That is to say, with hardly any instruments, so it would take a lot of work to make it.

It's an impressive piece of work, in which, just like what happenswith many other prehistoric sites its meaning is unknown. Although the continuous excavations in the area increasingly provide more data. And it is that the Neolithic Heart of Orkney is not only made up of the four places that we have already mentioned, more material remains are continually coming to light in the vicinity of the Ring of Brodgar that provide signs of the tools that were used, or ceramic and bone remains to be able to learn more about the first settlers of the island.

Instead what has never been excavated in the Ring of Brodgar is the center of the circle. Something curious since in other henges scattered throughout the British geography, such as the one in Averbury, it was seen that various stones were also distributed within the larger circle. So who knows what future archaeological surprises this jewel of Prehistory may provide?

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