Monet's Trouville Black Rocks Hotel

Monet's Trouville Black Rocks Hotel
Monet's Trouville Black Rocks Hotel
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Monet is famous for having invented Impressionism, in the development of which painting outdoors played a tremendous role. Well, he learned that habit of going with his canvases, oil paintings and easel to an outside place and starting to paint from another painter. Specifically it wasEugene Boudin, an artist from the region ofNormandy, specializing in painting the seascapes of his region in which they alternate the beaches and cliffs

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Monet's Trouville Black Rocks Hotel

In fact, Claude Monet met Boudin in the Atlantic city of Le Havre in 1856, and with him he made numerous marine paintings, which were the ones that began to give it a certain name. And although later he changed themes and his technique evolved towards the purest impressionism, it is fair to recognize the influence ofBoudinand also of the Norman coast. To which he also returned many times, as we can see in this painting from 1870 that is preserved in theMusée d'Orsay in Paris

The work represents the Black Rocks Hotel in the resort town of Trouville. An establishment of some fame, and that has more than one link with art. Not only with painting, since it is thought that he could have influenced the imagination of Marcel Proust to conceive the Hotel Balbec that appears in his famous workIn Search of Lost Time.

And just as Boudin's influence must be mentioned, Monet himself also recognized during his lifetime the influence of the theories of John Ruskin, an English art critic, who in his writings already spoke of the fact that it was the eye that should create the images in the paintings. Something that led the French painter to a way of painting with which he did not focus on the contours, nor on the tactile qualities of the objects or elements portrayed. He was not even looking for chiaroscuro, what he intended to see in front of a landscape, both natural and urban, and both with and without figures, the only thing he wanted to see was the vibrations of color, and that was what he transferred to the canvas, in independent brushstrokes from each other, and I wanted to create the light and the impression that you have at that precise moment of what you are contemplating.

Although it must also be recognized that there is an important gesture in his art. His brushstrokes are quick, but he does not adhere to a very rigid scheme of acting, as if pointillists likeSeuratwould later do. Monet applies his brushstrokes with spots of color in very free forms and with enormous fluidity, it is enough to see how different the way of painting the flags waved by the sea breeze and the facade of the hotel that transmits all its forcefulness are in this painting monumental, despite that way of painting so light and fast. In other words, this painter was a true virtuoso with an innate ability to paint and to completely renew that artistic discipline.

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