Helena by Evelyn de Morgan

Helena by Evelyn de Morgan
Helena by Evelyn de Morgan
Anonim

Unfortunately, there are not too many women who appear prominently in Art History books. And besides, those few female names are repeated, almost always citing artists such as the Renaissance artist Artemisia Gentileschi or the Impressionism painter Mary Cassat.

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Helena by Evelyn de Morgan

However, many other women dared at the time to embark on an artistic career, despite the fact that they knew that their sex made their path to success and recognition much more difficult. Today we want to talk about one of those women, the British Evelyn de Morgan, the author of this painting titled Helena de Troya.

Actually, her name wasMary Evelyn Pickering, however since she got married, her husband's last name wasWilliam de Morgan, a prestigious potter. Evelyn was born in London in 1855, into a we althy family, which allowed her to take painting classes. And she was also able to travel to discover places likeFlorence, where she was absolutely amazed by the art ofSandro Botticelli

Hence it is not surprising that her work developed along pictorial paths akin to thePre-Raphaelite Brotherhoodthat had such a presence in the British art scene at the end of the century XIX. She was actually friends with many of her representatives, and a faithful follower of Burne Jones's art.

Although, although its aesthetic is undoubtedly indebted to pre-Raphaelite art, its theme is passed through the sieve of a woman. Hence, in her scenes, whether they are religious or literary and mythological, female images usually appear, loaded with symbolism and allegory, as in this case of Helena. And the truth is that Evelyn de Morgan achieved a certain reputation with her painting, and she combined this artistic work with the fight for women's rights, participating especially with the movements of the suffragettes. Just as she declared herself anti-war, like her husband with whom she lived from 1887 until his death in 1917, and just a couple of years later Evelyn died.

The result of all those years of artistic production is a set of paintings dominated by the archaic aesthetic ofPre-Raphaelite, which fits perfectly with the spirituality of the works of she. In them, the total protagonism of drawing over color is evident, which is always very soft and seems to remain like watertight compartments surrounded by sinuous lines that provide rhythm to her scenes and dynamism to her characters. And this image of Helena of Troy is a great example of that.

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