The Travelers by Bruno Catalano

The Travelers by Bruno Catalano
The Travelers by Bruno Catalano
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The French sculptor Bruno Catalano (1960 –) has exhibited his series of The Travelers on several occasions. These are figures of fragmented individuals, as broken or incomplete, each one with their different clothes and all of them following their own path. The author links this idea of ​​travel with his own biography. And it is that Catalano came to the world inMorocco, but when he was a child his family moved toMarseille, a key vital change in the development of the. He arrived inFranceat the age of 12, and he still has that image of arriving with a suitcase to a new place. Later he would travel more, since for a time he was a sailor, although he ended up becoming a sculptor, and almost luckily a gallery owner came across one of his works and from then on he has lived from his art, having these bronze figures as a great emblem, who like him have traveled around the world in different temporary exhibitions, both outdoors and in more conventional galleries.

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Bruno Catalano Traveler

His “travelers” are incomplete beings, they have full but also empty areas, and they walk to find those missing parts. They are sculptures in movement, carrying their life, their feelings, their experiences and their desires, everything fits in their gesture of walking and in that suitcase that everyone carries.

In fact, that suitcase is essential not only in terms of the message, but also in terms of the sculptural form.There is the point of union between the top and the bottom. And in the middle there are parts of the body, and others that are missing. Creating the mystery and also integrating it into the environment, since the colors of its location end up being incorporated into the figures. It can be understood as each place you pass or travel is impregnated in you, forming your character. Although it can also be related to an emptiness that is always carried on one's back.

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Travellers in Marseille

The interpretations do not end here. They have also been explained as figures that have a part in one place and one time, but being incomplete they reflect that there are other parts that are in another place and another moment. As if the sculptor proposed us a game of escapism.

Actually, the author has explained it several times. He confesses that with each of his trips he has felt that he left parts of himself in each place he passed. Parts he will never find again. According to himself, he says that these sculptures are still representations of a citizen of the world. Although he also adds that of course everyone who watches them can interpret what they want, that's part of his charm, everyone can complete them with different ideas.

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