Christ of Lecina

Christ of Lecina
Christ of Lecina
Anonim

The Collegiate Church of Santa María la Mayor de Alquézar is a first-rate monument in many respects. First for its spectacular location and its interesting architecture originating in Romanesque times and modified during subsequent centuries. Also inside it keeps endless works of art from different periods and creative disciplines. From altarpieces to Gothic mural paintings, passing through a series of Romanesque capitals carved in its pentagonal cloister that we can consider among the most interesting in northern Spain.

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Christ of Lecina

And as if that were not enough, it has a work of extraordinary value due to its rarity. We refer to the Christ of Lecina, a pine wood carving from the middle of the 12th century. A type of polychrome sculpture that although it could have been very common in the Middle Ages, the truth is that very few copies have survived to this day. Centuries-old wood art is always something rare and highly coveted, since it must be taken into account that many pieces of this material have been consumed by flames in the usual fires of yesteryear. In addition, since they were relatively light pieces, they were an easy object to move from one place to another, and that could sometimes cause damage or simply disappear due to theft, looting, or simple buying and selling.

In fact, the sculpture of the Christ of Lecina does not originate from the temple ofAlquézar. It arrived here in the 17th century, when the we althy Lecina family created the chapel of Santo Cristo, originally a personal one within the Collegiate Church. It was then that this representation of the Crucified Christ was brought here.

Its value is not only due to its nature as a relatively unique piece, but also because it reflects a moment of change in artistic trends. This Christ is on horseback of Romanesque art and Gothic art. The specific date on which it was carved is known, it was in 1152, and its author presents us with a crucified with four nails, that is, two in the hands and another two in the separate feet, which is more typical of theRomanesque. However, the posture with the head bowed, indicating certain suffering, as well as the face with a somewhat calm expression, are already elements that characterized this type of crucified Christs during the Gothic. era.

And by the way, one last curiosity, the different studies that have been carried out on the work, including a complete restoration at the end of the 20th century, prove that it was originally a figure with articulated arms, which which undoubtedly facilitated its transport.

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