Palaces of Augustusburg and Falkenlust

Palaces of Augustusburg and Falkenlust
Palaces of Augustusburg and Falkenlust
Anonim

The ensemble of the Palaces of Augustusburg and Falkenlust in the German town of Brühl represent a lavish example of the Germanic architecture of the last baroque and early rococo art. Especially in the case of Augustusburg Palace, the larger and older of the two.

In this case it is a large U-shaped construction, with three floors and two attics, with a clear differentiation between the winter and summer areas, with different orientations and a wide variety of decoration. In fact, it is in the decoration of the different rooms and lounges, or in the impressive staircase, where the rococo spirit of the work is best captured.

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Augustusburg Palace

Its creators were the architects Johann Conrad Schlaun, who made the plans, and who later developed François de Cuvilliés. Together they made this commission for the Prince Archbishop of Cologne Philip Augustus of Bavaria. In fact, the rulers of the wonderful Gothic cathedral of Cologne have been the owners of this land for centuries, located about 20 kilometers from the big city. And after the destruction of a previous residence, the powerful archbishop commissioned this work in the early 18th century.

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Falkenlust Palace

And later, he commissioned François de Cuvilliés to build the neighboringPalace ofFalkenlust, as a hunting lodge, inspired by the Nymphenburg Palace where the Amelienburg pavilion had been built. The work was carried out between 1729 and 1740, and between both palatial residences a long avenue unfolds that serves as the axis of the third major element of this complex: its gardens.

A waste of imagination and also inspiration from the French gardens of the Baroque and Rococo era. In fact, the same applies to both the gardens and the interior decoration of both buildings, since the Archbishop of Cologne spared no expense, and brought here a host of artists and craftsmen, not only from Germany, but also from many other places in Europe.

The result is lavish. It is therefore not surprising that it was used during the second half of the 20th century, as the state-owned Palace of Augustusburg became the perfect accommodation for many of the personalities hosted by the head of state of Germany. And today it is a place that can be visited by the general public and is listed as World Heritage by UNESCO.

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