Lucrezia Panciatichi from Bronzino

Lucrezia Panciatichi from Bronzino
Lucrezia Panciatichi from Bronzino
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Agnolo di Cosimo (1503 – 1572), i.e. Il Bronzino, was a famous portrait painter of the 16th century. He was a painter ofMannerist stylebefore whom many aristocrats posed, as he knew how to give such effigies a striking atmosphere of elegance, which even had something unnatural about it. In that sense this work from 1540 is understood where he portraysLucrezia Panciatichi. An oil on panel that is currently part of the excellent collection of Italian painting in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Where by the way is also the portrait that Bronzino made at the same time of her husbandBartolomeo Panciatichi, a respected Florentine politician

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Lucrezia Panciatichi from Bronzino

We see the woman seated, standing out against a very dark background, and she poses without losing sight of the painter, and therefore the viewer. But she looking at everyone with a certain arrogance, she in a gesture of disdain towards us. It conveys coldness, and in fact, Bronzino's portraits have been defined on many occasions as icy images, as if the painter had wanted to capture in an obvious way the insurmountable distance between the person portrayed and the person who contemplates it.

That separation between one and the other is marked in multiple ways. For example, with that stylized woman's body, which has an excessively long and very white neck, but as elegant as asculpture to support that exclusive repertoire of jewels where the pearl necklace, a brooch and a long gold chain are not lacking, in which if we were to approach it with a magnifying glass we would read an inscription alluding to the love and fidelity that marriage has.

The jewels do not end here. A gold and ruby ​​ring is also seen on her left hand. In addition to an opulent satin and velvet dress, which also marks a certain coldness. But above all, it gives Bronzino the opportunity to show all his pictorial skill with the play of light and shadow in the folds. Something that we have to imagine that the painter would do with delight, while the woman would stoically endure posing. Her gesture tells us something like this, as if she were waiting for the moment when the portraitist tells her to rest, so that she can continue reading the book that she has on her knee and where her right hand seems to indicate the point where she has interrupted her reading.

This is a gesture of arrogance or perhaps humanity. That doubt flies over many portraits of this artist. And maybe it was the key to his success, since his style always liked theMedicisand the most powerful ofFlorence, city ​​where he spent most of his life

His main training was acquired with Jacopo Pontormo, although he also spent time with Andrea del Sarto. So he drank from the last greatRenaissance painter, and soaked up all themannerist artofPontormo, with whom he worked hand in hand on several occasions. In fact, Bronzino must be considered forown merits as one of the great representatives of Mannerism.

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